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Caucasus International Vol. 2 No: 2 - Summer - 2012

By Editor CI

views: 800

Oct 12, 2014 - 12:37 AM

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Caucasus International Vol. 3 - No: 3 - Autumn - 2013

By Editor CI

views: 798

Oct 12, 2014 - 12:48 AM

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Caucasus International Vol. 2 No: 3 - Autumn - 2012

By Editor CI

views: 790

Oct 12, 2014 - 12:40 AM

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Superpowers and International Governance: A ‘Might Is Right’ Story? Klaus Larres

By ilgar Gurbanov

views: 784

Sep 30, 2015 - 3:44 PM

International governance has frequently been imposed by outright force, or more subtly by means of political, economic and military pressure. The modern world of superpowers has been no exception. In fact, their sheer overwhelming political and economic power and military might has rendered the temptation to enforce their will while ignoring or sidelining the views of other countries apparently irresistible. Nevertheless, examples from both the Cold War era and the post-Cold War world demonstrate that even superpowers cannot do as they wish. The structure of the international system as developed since 1945, along with the influence of democracy, a growing global acknowledgment of the importance of a culture of consensus and cooperation in international affairs imposes powerful constraints. This often, though not always, ensures that might is not always right. Increasingly, individual great powers do not get away with behaving like a bull in a china shop. This includes the United States (invasion of Iraq) and Russia (Crimea, Ukraine); both countries have faced significant negative consequences for their violations of international law and the conventions of global governance. Read more...

Caucasus International Vol. 3 • No: 4 • Winter 2013-2014

By Editor CI

views: 763

Nov 6, 2014 - 4:07 PM

Elections in Eurasia: Reflections and Prospects Vol. 3 • No: 4 • Winter 2013-2014 Read more...

Bringing Russian and Iranian Gas to the Georgian Market: Technically Challenging, Economically Unfeasible and Politically Costly?; Bartosz Mendyk

By ilgar Gurbanov

views: 763

Jan 18, 2016 - 12:24 PM

After the disintegration of the Soviet Union, the three South Caucasus countries found themselves in a power vacuum, which led to various geopolitical events and even catastrophes (such as territorial conflicts and separatism). However, this vacuum also enabled two of the newly independent South Caucasus countries – Azerbaijan and Georgia – to jointly implement major oil and gas projects, the Baku-Tbilisi- Ceyhan oil pipeline and Baku-Tbilisi-Erzurum gas pipeline, both of which bypassed Russia. Initially, the two states were dependent on Russia which was a key transit country for Azerbaijan and a major gas supplier to Georgia. After August War in 2008, Georgia suspended its gas imports from Russia, except the volume received as a ‘transit fee’ for the gas supplied to Armenia. Since 2007, Azerbaijan, by virtue of its vast energy resources, has been supplying the majority of Georgia’s oil and gas demand and almost completely met its strategic ally’s energy needs when the Russian supplies were cut down during 2008 war. However, a statement by Georgia’s Energy Minister Kakha Kaladze in September 2015 on the purchase of Russian and potentially Iranian gas by Georgia raised some questions. This article will examine the extent to which the purchase of Russian gas is realistic and compatible with Georgia’s national interests and to what extent it poses the risk to its relations with Azerbaijan, as well as the feasibility of bringing the Iranian gas to Georgia given the technical shortcomings and political backlash displayed by Russia. The author’s arguments are based on the reliability of Azerbaijan as both supplier and neighbor, as well as the technical difficulties and political repercussions respectively of bringing Iranian and Russian gas to Georgia. Read more...

Caucasus International Vol. 4 • No: 3-4 • Winter 2014-2015

By ilgar Gurbanov

views: 731

Jun 2, 2015 - 1:58 PM

Experiences of NATO’s Partnership for Peace (PfP) in the Post-Soviet Space: 20 Years On Read more...

Caucasus International Vol. 2 No: 1 - Spring - 2012

By Editor CI

views: 729

Oct 12, 2014 - 12:34 AM

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The Global Climate Has Always Been Broken: Failures of Climate Governance as Global Governmentality; Scott Hamilton

By ilgar Gurbanov

views: 719

Sep 30, 2015 - 3:33 PM

International climate governance is commonly referred to as a failure, due to the inability of states to take substantive action against anthropogenic global climate change. This raises an important question: if international collective action is required so as to heal, fix, or prevent further damage to the global climate, have we ever had a concept of the global climate that was not damaged, broken, or in need of international governance? This article argues that we have not. Today’s naturalized concept of a ‘global’ climate emerged in international relations only as recently as the late- 1980s, framed from its outset as a broken or damaged global object resulting from failures of governance to steward the Earth. By combining the Foucauldian tools of governmentality and genealogy, this article traces how an implicit ‘rationality of powerlessness’ has undergirded the global climate since its international political inception; from the 1979 World Climate Conference, to its global spread in the mid- 1980s by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), to its naturalized meaning today. This powerlessness, crystalizing in explicit political failures of governance, is shown to be an implicit global governmentality: a shaping, conducting, and governing of thought and action, by a concept of global climate change that is at its conceptual root always already broken, thereby engendering failure in a Sisyphean quest to fix what is conceptually unfixable. Read more...

'Is Azerbaijani Gas a Game Changer in Balkan Energy Geopolitics?' by Plamen Dimitrov

By Editor CI

views: 712

Jan 10, 2017 - 12:27 AM

Until now, the Russian company Gazprom has been the dominant gas supplier of the Balkan countries. Most of the projects for new gas pipelines in the Balkans have failed or have become stagnant in recent years for two main reasons: lack of gas to feed them (Nabucco, ITGI, Bulgaria’s “Balkan” gas hub), or an adverse geopolitical environment (South Stream, Turkish Stream). But it is already clear that Azerbaijani gas from the Shah Deniz field will reach Balkans through the Southern Gas Corridor. This article examines the Balkan routes of the Azerbaijani gas, and answers the question of how this new source of gas will influence the energy geopolitics of Turkey, Bulgaria, and Greece. The conclusion is that the gas from Shah Deniz will trace out a new energy corridor through the southern part of the Balkans. Pursuant to this, an additional gas supply infrastructure could be built around this corridor – LNG terminals, interconnectors and new pipelines to bring gas from Turkmenistan, Iraq, or from the Eastern Mediterranean to Europe. Azerbaijani gas will, to a significant degree, act as a game changer in the Balkan energy geopolitics, although Gazprom will retain its role as a main supplier for the region. Read more...
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