CI Magazine / New issue

Colloquy with Richard Falk, "Syria: The United Nations’ Responsibility to Protect Civilians under Question"

By Editor CI

Jan 13, 2018 - 3:45 PM

The current global powers have been unable to prevent the worst humanitarian crisis since WWII, leaving a gigantic humanitarian gap in Syria. Sadly, in the lack of a global people’s movement, this gap remains. Questions need to be asked as to why did those in power failed Syria; why individuals have also failed; and why there seems to be no collective human conscience that is tantamount to the scale of the suffering. Richard Falk – Professor Emeritus of International Law at Princeton University and distinguished professor in Global and international Studies at University of California and the Former UN Special Rapporteur – provides Caucasus International with vital insights into how the internal functioning of the UN resulted in its flawed response to Syria, as well as the factors that prevented the UN from applying the R2P charter. The R2P charter was created to prevent exactly the kind of atrocities unfolding in Syria. Most importantly, Falk provides us with important advice on what must be done, both within the UN as well as on the part of the international community in order to prevent further atrocities in future. Read more...

Colloquy with Ambassador Nassir Abdul Karim Abdul Rahim, "Relations between the Republic of Azerbaijan and the State of Palestine"

By Editor CI

Jan 13, 2018 - 3:43 PM

Azerbaijan as a secular Muslim country attaches a great importance to the strengthening of Islamic Solidarity with other Muslim countries. In the light of weak support from the Western countries on Azerbaijan’s territorial integrity and the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, Azerbaijan strongly leans on the support of the Muslim states. A differentiated support also is obvious in the case of Israeli-Palestinian dispute. Therefore, the CI team conducted the next series of interview with Ambassador of the State of Palestine to the Republic of Azerbaijan Nassir Abdul Karim Abdul Rahim. The interview’s text covered the multiple issues such history of Azerbaijan-Palestine relations, role and importance of Azerbaijan in the Muslim world, Israeli-Palestine dispute, as well as the U.S’s recent decision concerning Jerusalem. Read more...

"Islam and the post-Cold War West: Necessity of an international solidarity in the remaking of a new world order" by Anar Naghiyev

By Editor CI

Jan 13, 2018 - 3:42 PM

One of the objectives of Islamic studies is to research the influence and role of Islam in global politics. Measuring the extent of Islamic influence in foreign policy implementation is as important as identifying religious identities and how those identities are manifested; for instance in acts of terrorism. Islam has been a culture for millions of people for centuries, and Koran does not promote violence or aggressiveness. Similar to other religions, it is unique in essence and inclusive in character. Thus Islam should not be associated with terror, anger, or hatred. Nor should Islamophobia be allowed to become mainstream, a frequent, at times common, phenomenon in the West. The global fight against terrorism should uphold the safety of ordinary Muslims; accordingly, Islamophobia should be prioritized as a global threat. In light of these concerns, this article critically examines the way Islam is dealt with in international politics in the post-Cold War era. Read more...

"Challenges to Islamic Solidarity: The Case of Turkish HNGOs" by Pınar Akpınar

By Editor CI

Jan 13, 2018 - 3:41 PM

This study investigates the role of Islamic solidarity in the conceptions, motivations, and practices of Turkish HNGOs. While Islamic solidarity plays an important role in the conceptions, motivations and practices of these HNGOs, it is, at times, limited by their strong sense of affiliation with Turkey and Turkish patriotism. In this sense, Islamic solidarity can be downplayed when there is a stronger sense of national affiliation. Furthermore, the sustainability of these HNGOs, and therefore the extent to which they are able to extend Islamic solidarity, is dependent upon the convergence of their ideas and interests with Turkey’s current government. In a similar vein, it remains under question whether these HNGOs would feel the same level of patriotism under a different government. As such, the support they enjoy from the government and the affiliation they feel with Turkey feed into one another. Moreover, Islamic solidarity offered by Turkish HNGOs could be challenged by their overreliance on the precarious space provided for them by the current Turkish government. Read more...

"Reexamining the Concept of Responsibility to Protect in Light of the Mass Atrocities in Myanmar" by Najiba Mustafayeva

By Editor CI

Jan 13, 2018 - 3:38 PM

Despite significant achievements in the international human rights regime, millions of civilians still fall victim to unimaginable atrocities that continue to shock the conscience of humanity and threaten international peace and security. Mass murders of national, ethnic, and religious groups have continued with depressing frequency — most recently in Myanmar, where violence broke out again in late August 2017, after security forces launched an operation against Rohingya Muslims. There were more than 1,000 fatalities, and 800,000 civilians were forced to seek refuge in neighboring Bangladesh. The international community has failed to prevent gross and systematic atrocities, and the vow of “never again” risks becoming an empty promise. The question remains: when, if ever, it is appropriate for the international community to take coercive actions against a sovereign state for the purpose of protecting people at risk in that state? The challenge is the legal reconciliation of the two main jus cogens principles of international law – state sovereignty, and the need to protect the fundamental human rights of populations at risk from their own governments. The answer lies within the concept of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P), and this article examines R2P through an analysis of the role of state responsibility as it relates to national sovereignty in the light of mass atrocities committed against Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar. Read more...

"Reflections on Faith-Based Solidarity and Social Membership: Beyond Religion? The Case of Lebanese Shiite FBOs" by Estella Carpi

By Editor CI

Jan 13, 2018 - 3:36 PM

During the July 2006 postwar period in Beirut’s southern suburbs (Dahiye), which were destroyed by the Israeli air force in its effort to annihilate the Lebanese Shiite party Hezbollah, the Islamic Shi‘a philanthropic sphere has been growing. It has pioneered the postwar reconstruction process and local relief provision, while diversely defining itself in relation to its secular and faith-based counterparts. This paper examines the extent to which religious providers develop solidarity with or antagonism towards provider members of the same community in times of crisis. Indeed, intra-community solidarity among different aid providers tends to be taken for granted. Problematizing this common belief is particularly important for defining the ways in which social solidarity either develops or contracts across faith-based communities during conflict-induced displacement. In this context, aid provision and local accountability remain fundamental litmus papers. Drawing on in-depth, semi-structured interviews conducted in Dahiye from 2011 to 2013 with Lebanese Shiite faith-based organizations and private initiatives, a secular local organization, and their respective beneficiaries, this paper advances reflections on how social membership and acts of solidarity and charity interact within the Lebanese philanthropic scenario. Read more...

"Turkey-Azerbaijan Relations after 15 July: Expectations, Solidarity and Cooperation" by Hüsrev Tabak and Özgür Tüfekçi

By Editor CI

Jan 13, 2018 - 3:35 PM

The 15 July failed coup in Turkey changed the country’s foreign policy priorities. Since then, the country has redefined its relations with a number of countries based on how they responded to the coup attempt, and whether they cooperated with Ankara in apprehending the penetrators, the FETÖ. Given that 2017 marked the 25th anniversary of the establishment of official diplomatic relations between Turkey and Azerbaijan, and that the two countries have had steady and mutually supportive policies throughout this time, this paper examines whether the post-15 July environment has led to changes in the relationship. Specifically, the paper analyzes Azerbaijan’s response to the ‘fight on FETÖ’, and the development of relations following the coup attempt. Our assessment of the post-15 July political developments suggests that bilateral relations have affirmed the path dependency of the two countries. The attempted coup and its consequences have not had any kind of negative impact on relations; on the contrary, the support Azerbaijan showed to Turkey in the ‘fight on FETÖ’ has deepened mutual trust, thereby further strengthening the path dependent solidarity and cooperation. Read more...

"Response to Regional Challenges: Why Strategic Partnership of Azerbaijan and Pakistan is Important?" by Fuad Shahbazov

By Editor CI

Jan 13, 2018 - 3:34 PM

This article examines the degree of awareness at the grassroots level in Azerbaijan and Pakistan regarding the growing bilateral strategic cooperation. During the last several years, relations between Baku and Islamabad have expanded rapidly to the level of a strategic partnership encompassing various fields such as military, humanitarian issues, diplomatic, and cultural issues. Building strategic partnerships with countries in the region and beyond has always been a guiding principle of Azerbaijan’s foreign policy strategy. The common religious background of both countries also plays a significant role in strengthening bilateral ties. Pakistan’s explicit support of Azerbaijan in the international diplomatic arena, in particular in regard to the resolution process of the most complex and dangerous conflict in the South Caucasus – the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is among those significant factors. The article traces the key moments in Azerbaijani – Pakistan relations, and outlines the achievements, prospects, and potential for strengthening economic and security ties. Read more...

"Azerbaijan – Iran Cultural Relations: Dynamics and Potentials" by Mesiaga Mahammadi

By Editor CI

Jan 13, 2018 - 3:33 PM

The article surveys the historical and current state of cultural relations between the Republic of Azerbaijan and the neighboring Islamic Republic of Iran, and discusses the main directions and potential opportunities of further cultural cooperation. The centuries-old cultural affinity and coexistence have been key to the expansion of bilateral relations; the common cultural heritage led to a long-standing relationship between the two countries - even during the Soviet era. After Azerbaijan regained its independence, Azerbaijan-Iran cultural relations have begun to further expand and deepen. During the early years of Azerbaijan's independence, Iran favored the religious dimension of cultural relations, which later caused some problems in the relationship. But over time, the signing of numerous documents on cultural cooperation between the two countries, and the establishment of an appropriate legal base enabled the relationship to cover various spheres in this direction. From 2003, cinema, music, theater and literature have played an important role in cultural relations between the two countries; in addition, significant steps have been taken to boost ties in science and education. Read more...
Copyright © 2011-2018 by Caucasus International All rights reserved.